Tag Archives: Writing

E-Book is Out

1 Jul

The issues surrounding the publication of my book, Foleytown, have been resolved, and both the e-book and the print versions are available at Authorhouse, Amazon, and Barnes and Noble. The e-book is only $3.99, so I expect all five of my regular readers to buy one (just kidding!)

From the book’s blurb:

Foleytown is a special place…a place where there is always a shortage of money but never a shortage of laughs. Follow the children of the large, financially struggling Foley clan as they navigate through “bloody” pomegranate fights, epic games of Christmas Card War, homemade bridesmaid dresses, fears of itinerant serial killers, and the cherished summer tradition they called “Prune-Why-Oh” – all while learning how to grow up in a very unfashionable part of California.

As Jack Lord would have said in 1969, “Be there — Aloha!”

One of My Books is Live!

14 Jun

My book Foleytown  is finally on sale online, although the ebook hasn’t shown up at Amazon yet and I’m trying to iron that out with the publisher. But you can order the physical book for $13.99 and the ebook for $3.99 at Authorhouse; the dead-tree version is also $13.99 Amazon. Note: If you buy it from Authorhouse I get a few more shekels than if you buy it from Amazon.

Here’s a description of the book:

Foleytown is a special place…a place where there is always a shortage of money but never a shortage of laughs. Follow the children of the large, financially struggling Foley clan as they navigate through “bloody” pomegranate fights, epic games of Christmas Card War, homemade bridesmaid dresses, fears of itinerant serial killers, and the cherished summer tradition they called “Prune-Why-Oh” – all while learning how to grow up in a very unfashionable part of California.

If you order it, please leave me a review at either Authorhouse or Amazon. Thanks!

Self-Publishing Costs

7 Jun

From Jen Owenby, a useful post about how much you can expect to pay to produce a finished indie book, using free-lance editors, designers and proofreaders, etc.  I haven’t used any of these services myself, but it’s good to have a guide for future references.

‘The Warriors of the Sand’; Another Ghost Story

12 Mar

Now this one really IS a ghost story. I had long wanted to write about the peculiar and haunting ghost town of Bodie, California for more than a decade, since a classmate in a basic HTML class showed me some photos that he had taken there. The town of “Shelby” in my story is obviously based on Bodie; the story also references an old horror/fantasy story I read long ago entitled The Janissaries of Emillion. It’s kind of funny how these influences came together to produce my latest spookfest.

Here, without much further ado, is The Warriors of the Sand, in PDF format. I hope you like it!

New Ghost Story

10 Mar

Well, maybe it is not exactly a ghost story, but it is supposed to be a bit creepy. I was going to save the story for a posting on Earth Day, which is April 22, but since I’m in a major posting mood, I thought I’d post it today. Here, in PDF form, is “Fashionable Mrs Collier,” a story that was inspired by a haunting tale that I read about “The Green Man” many years ago. I hope you enjoy reading it!

Donald Trump’s Book Reviews!

9 Mar

This Buzzfeed article using Donald Trump’s Twitter writing style to review famous books is hilarious! I’ve been inspired to write several of my own reviews in Trump Twitterspeak. See what you think!

Brideshead Revisted: Loser Charles Ryder falls in love with a rich gay drunk, then gets dumped by the drunk’s sister. Pathetic!

The Great Gatsby: Dummy Jay Gatsby wastes five years pining for a selfish bimbo who only cares about herself.
His pink suits are a disgrace!

The Shining: Weirdo kid’s family moves into a creepy deserted hotel, then his dad goes apeshit.
Wouldn’t happen in a Trump hotel!

Lord of the Flies: Spoiled Limey brats get marooned on an island and worship a dead pig. Then they kill each other. Boring!

For Whom the Bell Tolls: Loser Robert Jordan fights for Spanish Commies, then gets wasted on a hill.
I respect the ones who didn’t get killed!

The Grapes of Wrath: Dummy Joad family moves to California expecting primo wages for farm work.
Then they find out it was a lie. Should have stayed in Oklahoma!

Madame Bovary: Greedy French bimbo cheats on her dopey doctor husband, then bankrupts him.
He should have gotten a good pre-nup like me!

The Canterbury Tales: A bunch of Limey losers gather at an inn and tell each other their life stories–boring. Dopey Chaucer couldn’t even speak real English!

Gone With the Wind: Dummy Scarlett O’Hara pines for dopey Ashley for years. She’s too dumb to see that Rhett Butler is her true love. I wouldn’t date her!

Little Women: Four penniless girls and their mom struggle to survive while their dad is away at war.
Marmee should have dumped the deadbeat dad and married rich old Mr. Laurence!

Classic Ghost Story

18 Apr

Does anybody read the classic ghost story anymore? I fell in love with this story format when I was about eight or nine, and my two older sisters gifted me with a couple of volumes of stories from the Golden Age of Ghost Stories in the late 19th–early 20th Century. I quickly learned to appreciate the work of authors such as M. R. James, F. Marion Crawford, August Derleth, Lady Cynthia Asquith, E. F. Benson, William Hope Hodgson, and H. Russel Wakefield. (Most of them were British, with a few Americans thrown in–although the Americans, like Ambrose Bierce and August Derleth, usually set their tales in the British Isles as well.)

I left those two books behind at my childhood home years ago, but some years back, I bought replacements for both from a used book site. I re-read them and enjoyed them even more as an adult–for one thing, I understood the somewhat archaic language, and some of the Britishisms, much better than I did at age nine.

I recently completed a short story in tribute to those old-fashioned ghost stories and I’m posting it here for my readers’ opinion (all five of you!). The story is a reworking of one of M. R. James’s most famous tales, Oh Whistle and I’ll Come to You My Lad, except that it’s been transplanted from early 20th Century England to rural California in the 1970s, and it contains a grim little twist at the end that I think James would have appreciated.

The story is part of a collection featuring the same location and characters, and this is one of the later ones in the collection, so it does reference a few events from the earlier stories. However, if you ignore those small  references, it pretty much stands well enough on its own. It’s called Water Summons. I hope you enjoy it.

In addition, here’s a link to an excellent TV dramatization of Oh Whistle and I’ll Come to You, My Lad from the late 1960s: