Tag Archives: Foleytown

Update on Literary Progress

22 Jul

My second book of short stories, Sutton County Line: Seven Supernatural Tales, In Homage to Ray Bradbury’s Greentown Stories, is done and I’m just doing line edits on the print-outs. As the title indicates, it’s a collection of loosely connected, fantasy/supernatural short stories inspired by Bradbury’s Greentown stories, but based in a facsimile of my own hometown in the North Central Valley of California. The first story is a novella entitled The Drowning Game and then following are six stories using the same setting and several of the same characters. I’ve been reliably informed that the novella is the hardest of all literary formats to sell to traditional publishers, so I will be self-publishing, most likely through Kindle Direct/Create Space instead.

I also started a new novel, which, like Sutton County Line, is in the literary supernatural/fantasy genre, with the working title of Herba Clepta. This started out as just a short story of about 5,000 words, and then it just grew into something more. I frequently do that, usually because I like to do deeper character development than most shorter formats allow.

 

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First Reviews of My Book Posted

9 Sep

Two reviews have so far been posted at Amazon for my recently published book, Foleytown. I’m pleased to say they are both five-star reviews!

A couple of quotes:

 

“I found this book, as the author hoped it would be, entertaining, humorous and with warmth embedded in its pages.”

“A wistful, nostalgic delight.”

 

I hope to get many more reviews, although I’m sure they won’t all be five stars!

Thanks to the reviewers for their input.

E-Book is Out

1 Jul

The issues surrounding the publication of my book, Foleytown, have been resolved, and both the e-book and the print versions are available at Authorhouse, Amazon, and Barnes and Noble. The e-book is only $3.99, so I expect all five of my regular readers to buy one (just kidding!)

From the book’s blurb:

Foleytown is a special place…a place where there is always a shortage of money but never a shortage of laughs. Follow the children of the large, financially struggling Foley clan as they navigate through “bloody” pomegranate fights, epic games of Christmas Card War, homemade bridesmaid dresses, fears of itinerant serial killers, and the cherished summer tradition they called “Prune-Why-Oh” – all while learning how to grow up in a very unfashionable part of California.

As Jack Lord would have said in 1969, “Be there — Aloha!”

One of My Books is Live!

14 Jun

My book Foleytown  is finally on sale online, although the ebook hasn’t shown up at Amazon yet and I’m trying to iron that out with the publisher. But you can order the physical book for $13.99 and the ebook for $3.99 at Authorhouse; the dead-tree version is also $13.99 Amazon. Note: If you buy it from Authorhouse I get a few more shekels than if you buy it from Amazon.

Here’s a description of the book:

Foleytown is a special place…a place where there is always a shortage of money but never a shortage of laughs. Follow the children of the large, financially struggling Foley clan as they navigate through “bloody” pomegranate fights, epic games of Christmas Card War, homemade bridesmaid dresses, fears of itinerant serial killers, and the cherished summer tradition they called “Prune-Why-Oh” – all while learning how to grow up in a very unfashionable part of California.

If you order it, please leave me a review at either Authorhouse or Amazon. Thanks!

Poem

9 Jun

I wrote this poem many years ago in tribute to the great early 19th Century English landscape and seascape painter, J. M. W. Turner, classified as a Romantic painter but who could also be termed one of the fathers of Impressionism, Expressionism and Abstract Expressionism, if not the father. The poem references one of Turner’s most famous watercolor paintings, called “Pink Sky Above a Grey Sea” , painted in 1822 but looking very much like it belongs in a mid-20th Century Gallery next to a painting by Mark Rothko:

Pink Sky (After Turner)

Thin paste of rosepetals
Sticks fast  a new sky
Pale sun creeping over the sludged waters
Pale moon fading, blind, a drowned eye
Lost in the lonely dawn. 

No bird speaks, yet an unheard song
Trills over the steely sea
Through which dank prison no flailing oar
Nor silver fin has flashed
To break the still of the lonely dawn

What great regard that God has shown
To have made for us this perfect Eye
This perfect Hand that limns the Earth’s great mould
And envies not His creation’s dazzled reply
To the birth of the lonely dawn. 

Looking at this poem after all these years, I realize that I didn’t know at the time whether it was a depiction of the horizon at dawn or at sunset; I assumed dawn. But the Tate Museum, which owns the painting, says it’s sunset, rendering my poem useless. But I still like it! I guess I could find another Turner painting about dawn and change the title.

Here’s some background on Turner from Biography.com.

 

 

New Follower

7 Jun

Thanks to my latest follower, Sabiscuit, who blogs at an extremely cool site. I’m humbled to be followed by somebody with a much cooler blog than mine. Go check out the site!

Quick Estimate

16 Mar

Sutton County Line is now at 37,000 words. Foleytown is around 60,000 words. Western Waste is about 100,000 words. Gatsby’s Ghost (unfinished) is about 25,000 words.

In the last six years, I’ve written nearly 250,000 words of fiction. That doesn’t include blog posts, an unfinished play, a couple of unfinished short stories, etc. Hard to believe!