Just Finished This One. . .

29 Sep

For a change of pace, I did this new painting in Sennelier oil pastels, mixed with turp and linseed oil (which seals the pastels so that they dry like regular oil paints.) I did a lot of scumbling in this pic, which I don’t usually do with regular oils, but for some reason, I feel that oil pastels just cry out for some really vigorous scumbling.

(“Scumbling” means scratching a layer of paint to show either the canvas underneath, or another layer of color that’s been put down previously and then allowed to dry. I used the handle of my paintbrush and even my fingernails on occasion to scratch in some of the detail.)

I bought French-made Sennelier pastels for this piece so I could brag that I used expensive materials for it on my Etsy site, but if the truth be told, ultra-cheap Pentel oil pastels actually worked a little bit better for this technique when I tried it a few years ago. The Sennelier pastels were a bit on the soft side and kept crumbling when rubbed into the canvas; the Pentels were sturdier. More proof that expensive isn’t always the best way to go, even for art materials.

The subject matter is an old,  giant prickly pear cactus that grows on the historic Reinstein Ranch in Livermore, California. The owners’ motto is “keepin’ it rural” and they maintain an old-fashioned, working, cattle and horse ranch right on the fringes of northern Silicon Valley. Multi-talented rancher Roberta Reinstein offers her own spectactular hand-made jewelry here.

“Prickly Pear, Reinstein Ranch” Copyright S. K. Cole, 2012. All rights reserved.

Advertisements

3 Responses to “Just Finished This One. . .”

  1. Brigettekaren@gmail.com September 30, 2012 at 5:27 pm #

    Susan,
    Love your “story”behind your Reinstein cactus. If I had a ranch or farm/barn style home I would buy it. I am sure you will sell this one soon!!! Brig

  2. Susan September 30, 2012 at 5:30 pm #

    Thanks, Brigette!

Trackbacks/Pingbacks

  1. On Sale | foleytown - March 12, 2013

    […] off here.  You can read more about this piece’s interesting history from this post back in September. Happy […]

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: